Program on Law and Society in the Muslim World

Visiting Fellowships 2023–2024

Applications due February 1, 2023

Harvard Law School’s Program on Law and Society in the Muslim World invites applications for Visiting Fellowships for the 2023–2024 academic year. This fellowship provides opportunities for outstanding scholars and legal practitioners to undertake research, writing, and scholarly engagement on law and society in Muslim majority and minority contexts. We are particularly interested in applicants whose work focuses on human rights, women’s rights, children’s rights, minority rights, animal welfare and rights, constitutional law, food law, environmental law and climate change in particular, migration and refugee studies, LGBTQ issues, and related areas.

We welcome applicants with advanced degrees (e.g., JD, LLM, SJD, PhD or other comparable degrees) and experienced practicing lawyers who aim to draw upon their legal experience in their Fellowship project. Fellows may spend from one month up to one academic year (excluding June-August) in residence at Harvard Law School working on an independent project. We seek applicants from a diverse range of backgrounds, academic traditions, and scholarly interests.

Fellows will receive a stipend of up to $5,000 per month. While Fellows will devote the majority of their time to their research projects, they are expected to participate in Program activities and contribute to the intellectual life of the Program. Fellows are expected to deliver a lecture or workshop related to their topic of interest. Under certain conditions, a PLSMW fellowship may be combined with another fellowship or award.

The deadline to submit all application materials (including letters of recommendation) is February 1, 2023, to be considered for a fellowship term during the 2023–2024 academic year. Click here for additional information and how to apply.

February 1, 2023

Harvard Law School’s Program on Law and Society in the Muslim World invites applications for Visiting Fellowships for the 2023–2024 academic year. This fellowship provides opportunities for outstanding scholars and legal practitioners to undertake research, writing, and scholarly engagement on law and society in Muslim majority and minority contexts. We are particularly interested in applicants whose work focuses on human rights, women’s rights, children’s rights, minority rights, animal welfare and rights, constitutional law, food law, environmental law, and climate change, in particular, migration and refugee studies, LGBTQ issues, and related areas.

We welcome applicants with advanced degrees (e.g., JD, LLM, SJD, PhD or other comparable degrees) and experienced practicing lawyers who aim to draw upon their legal experience in their Fellowship project. Fellows may spend from one month up to one academic year (excluding June-August) in residence at Harvard Law School working on an independent project. We seek applicants from a diverse range of backgrounds, academic traditions, and scholarly interests.

Fellows will receive a stipend of up to $5,000 per month. While Fellows will devote the majority of their time to their research projects, they are expected to participate in Program activities and contribute to the intellectual life of the Program. Fellows are expected to deliver a lecture or workshop related to their topic of interest. Under certain conditions, a PLSMW fellowship may be combined with another fellowship or award.

The deadline to submit all application materials (including letters of recommendation) is February 1, 2023, to be considered for a fellowship term during the 2023–2024 academic year. Click here for additional information and how to apply.

Application for Postdoctoral Research Associate

until: January 1, 2023

The Sharmin and Bijan Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Iran and Persian Gulf Studies at Princeton University invites applications for a postdoctoral research associate or more senior researcher in the relevant fields of Iran and the Persian Gulf in the 19th – 21st century. Anticipated to start in September 2023, the position is open to scholars of all academic disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. This full-time, twelve-month position is renewable annually for up to three years, subject to satisfactory performance and available funding. The center promotes interdisciplinary approaches to advancing the study of Iran and the Persian Gulf, with special attention to the region’s role and significance in the contemporary world. The goal of the program is to support outstanding scholars of Iran and the wider Persianate world at an early stage of their careers and thus to strengthen the field of Iranian and Persian Gulf Studies in the United States and abroad. In addition to their salary, researchers receive funding (up to $4,000 per academic year) for research-related expenses (books, conferences, travel expenses, etc.). The center provides office space and staff support as well as a taxable moving allowance to help defray domestic or international moving expenses. Researchers are required to be in residence in Princeton or the local vicinity or demonstrate to the program’s satisfaction the ability to be on campus on a daily basis and on short notice in order to fulfill responsibilities relating to in-person participation. They are responsible for their own accommodations. A Ph.D. conferred between 2018 and the start date is required. Candidates are required to apply online at https://www.princeton.edu/acad-positions/position/28265 and submit the following documents: (1) a cover letter with title and summary of the proposed research project (200 words); (2) a research proposal (max. 1500 words), including description of the project, bibliography, timetable, explicit goals, and the reason for pursuing at Princeton; (3) curriculum vitae and list of publications; (4) sample chapter (in English) of dissertation or other recent work; (5) contact information for three references. In order to be considered for this position, all application materials must be received by January 1, 2023, 11:59 pm EST.

DEADLINE: All materials must be received by January 1, 2023, 11:59 p.m. EST. The preferred start date is September 1, 2023. This position is subject to the University’s background check policy. Essential Qualifications: Ph.D. required (conferred between 2018 and appointment start date) Researchers may not pursue another degree while in this appointment, nor may they hold any other fellowships or visiting positions concurrently. Appointments cannot be deferred to a later term. Instructions for Applying: Complete the online application and click “Apply to this Posting” at the top of the posting details page. Documents that can be associated with this posting: Cover letter, Statement of Research Interest, Resume/CV, Bibliography/Publications List, Writing Sample, Other Document 1 Proposed Start Date: 09-01-2023. End date, if a Term Appointment: 09-01-2024. This twelve-month position may be renewed for up to three years, subject to satisfactory performance and the availability of funds. Princeton University is an equal opportunity/Affirmative Action employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to age, race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

How to Apply

The form must be completed to submit your application for this position. Please click here to see the form.

It is recommended that you read through the entire application and gather the required application materials before beginning your application. You will not be able to save or return to edit a partial application. Only complete applications will be accepted for consideration and the application form must be completed in its entirety before it can be submitted.

Upon submitting your application, you will receive a confirmation email at the email address that you provide in your application. In some cases, your references may be contacted using the email address that you provide for them and may be asked to provide their recommendation via a web-based form similar to the application form.

Be sure to provide the correct email addresses for you and all of your references to ensure that communications from Princeton University are properly delivered.

For more information send an email to iran@princeton.edu or call 6092580576 .

Call for Papers: Succession in Islamic Law

Conference in Hamburg from 30 to 31 March 2023

The conference addresses the role succession law played in Muslim communities in the past, how it unfolds today and what it implies for future generations. While family law has received extensive attention in Islamic law scholarship, succession law, often dubbed as the last bastion of the supposed immutability of Islamic law, has not been subject to similar scrutiny. This is surprising, given that rules and practices regarding succession are strongly intertwined with family structures and the economy.

We follow a broad definition of succession law, one encompassing all forms of transfer of property between generations. This also includes phenomena not usually associated with succession law, like family foundations (awqāf) or forms of inter vivos transfer of property. We invite submissions that address the intergenerational transfer of property in various historical and regional contexts. Our aim is to bring together different methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives (especially from law, history, economics, anthropology, Middle Eastern/regional studies, gender studies and sociology).

We are particularly, but not exclusively, interested in:

  1. The formation of Islamic succession law.
  2. Islamic succession law in the modern nation state.
  3. The intergenerational transfer of property inter vivos and mortis causa through wills, contracts and/or donations.
  4. Inter-religious succession law.
  5. The role of the family waqf.
  6. Succession among Muslim minority communities.Paper Submission: Papers should be based on original, unpublished research. We welcome contributions from scholars of all stages of their career. Please send the abstract of your proposed paper (up to 300 words) by 15 September 2022, to Ms Tess Chemnitzer (chemnitzer@mpipriv.de). We will conduct a blind peer review and send out decisions by 1 October 2022. Publication plans and options will be discussed during the conference.Organization: The Succession in Islamic Law-Conference is being organized by the Research Group “Changes in God’s Law – An Inner-Islamic Comparison of Family and Succession Laws” at the Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law in Hamburg, Germany. The conference will take place in person in Hamburg, 30-31 March 2023. The program includes a keynote lecture by David Powers (Cornell University).

    Funding: We will provide funding for all presenters (travel costs and accommodation).

    Max Planck Working Group “IGTOPI”: After the conference, interested participants will be invited to join the Max Planck Working Group on the Intergenerational Transfer of Property in Islam (IGTOPI), which is currently being set up. The Working Group will host meetings, provide a platform to exchange ideas and offer opportunities to collaborate on future publications to further the study of Islamic succession law.

I.B.Tauris Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Persian Literature

I.B.Tauris is seeking book proposals for a new academic book series: I.B.Tauris Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Persian Literature.

 

This series provides a forum for cutting-edge scholarship from established and emerging scholars in the field of Persian literary studies. It publishes monographs that challenge received understandings of the primary source material and offer new ways of approaching both familiar and obscure texts. The series editor and advisory board encourage submissions from authors who adopt a comparative approach to the study of Persian literature that spans genres, periods, regions, and/or languages, however, studies of distinct periods and individual poets (or clusters of poets) will also be considered. The temporal scope of the series is the first millennium of literary production in New Persian, circa 850-1850, encompassing the medieval (or pre-modern) and the early modern periods. The geographical range is the full expanse of the Persianate world, from Anatolia and the Caucasus in the west, through Iran and Afghanistan, to Central and South Asia in the east. Read more

CFP for International Conference on Philosophical Anthropology in Ibn Sina

On December 26-28, 2021, IRIP will host an international conference on Ibn Sina’s philosophical anthropology. The goal of this conference is to gather Ibn Sina researchers from all around the world to read and interpret Ibn Sina’s anthropological doctrines in light of his metaphysical, physical, and psychological works. Since Ibn Sina does not restrict the study of human nature to natural sciences, the attempt to clarify his philosophical anthropology deserves considerations beyond their limits. Some of the significant resources in this regard are Ibn Sina’s own books and monographs on psychology, some of which are part of aš-Šifāʾ (The Cure), an-Najāt (The Salvation), ʿUyūn al-ḥikma (Elements of Philosophy), Dānešnāme-ye ʿAlāʾī (Philosophy for ʿAlāʾ-ad-Dawla) and al-Išārāt wa-t-tanbīhāt (Pointers and Reminders), while some others are contained in separate treatises. In addition to psychology, topics like ethics, political philosophy, cosmology, philosophy of religion, and philosophy of language are worth addressing in order to clarify Ibn Sina’s anthropology. We are hopeful that this conference will be a significant contribution to the contemporary studies of Ibn Sina and will throw light on some understudied aspects of his thought.

Read more

Enshrining the Past: Religion and Heritage-Making in a Secular Age

Workshop at the Centre for Advanced Studies “Multiple Secularities – Beyond the West, Beyond Modernities”, Leipzig University

27 – 29 October 2021

Convenors:
Marian Burchardt and Nur Yasemin Ural (both Leipzig University)

As the intensity of the politics around cultural identity is growing across the world, the notion of heritage-making, or “heritagisation”, has acquired new political urgency. At the same time, these politics have animated far-flung controversies over the religious and secular sources of belonging along with the values of ethnic, religious and racial majorities, minorities and the states that are supposed to represent them. This raises an intriguing set of questions: Under what conditions and with what consequences are certain religious artefacts, rituals and worldviews framed as heritage? Whose religious heritage is considered worthy to be selected, canonised and ennobled as elementary for nations’ collective memory? Who is systematically excluded and left to oblivion in the politics of religious and secular heritage? Which social groups are central to these processes? Read more

Human Rights and Foreign Policy Conference

Human Rights and Foreign Policy: 7th Joint Human Rights (Virtual) Conference

We are pleased to announce that the seventh joint international conference on human rights, on the theme Human Rights and Foreign Policy, will take place from 14 to 16 June 2020 online (hosted by the Human Rights Consortium, University of London).

In light of geopolitical rebalancing of power, challenges to human rights from a number of quarters, and waning international support for human rights, the role of human rights in foreign policy requires urgent investigation. For human rights to thrive internationally, states need to support them not only domestically but also in their foreign policies, both in their bilateral relations and multilaterally. Yet, there is significant divergence of practice. Clear challenges appear in the policies of traditional supporters of human rights. This includes actions of the Trump administration on multiple fronts, as well as European states and the EU as a whole. European policy on refugees, for example, severely threatens basic international norms. And UK support for Saudi Arabia even as it carries on a murderous war in Yemen highlights hypocrisy.

Whereas a certain set of middle powers have traditionally been supporters of human rights internationally, and have explicitly incorporated human rights into their foreign policies, emerging powers in the developing world represent a much more diverse set of actors and perspectives on human rights and international institutions which, while providing opportunities for new kinds of engagement, also pose significant challenges.

Much of the work on human rights and foreign policy has focused on one state in particular – the United States – although there is increasing focus on the European Union, and there is clearly a need for much broader investigation and analysis, and broad-based comparative studies are scarce. Thus, an overarching question for the conference is: in 2021, what does foreign policy support for human rights look like?

Potential questions to be addressed during the conference include: Read more

A Long View of Diplomacy and Spatiality in the Pre-Modern Islamic World

A World of Realms: A Long View of Diplomacy and Spatiality in the Premodern Islamic World.

Workshop

University of Antwerp – Belgium, May 20-21, 2021

Keynote speaker: Sanjay Subrahmanyam (UCLA/Collège de France)

Power in History: Centre for Political History invites papers that inquire into the spatial dimensions of diplomacy and their relation to conceptions of territoriality in the larger Islamic world, from the 7th to the early 19th century, as part of a two-day interdisciplinary workshop held at the University of Antwerp and hosted by the History Department on May 20-21, 2021.

Read more

Iranian Journal of Islamic Studies (IJIS)

Authors are cordially invited to submit scholarly articles concerned with Islamic Studies to the Iranian Journal of Islamic Studies (IJIS), which will officially launch in March 2020. IJIS is a quarterly journal of The University of Religions and Denomination (URD). This journal will also submit applications for Web of Science and Scopes after its two first issues get published.

About the Journal

The Iranian Journal of Islamic Studies is mainly concerned to help promote understanding and dialogue among the Islamic Denominations so as to help prepare the ground for peaceful coexistence and friendship among Muslims all around the world. It will be devoted to the examination of all aspects of Islam and the Islamic world. Special attention will be paid to works on Islamic Jurisprudence (Fiqh), Islamic Theology (Kalam), history of Islam, politics, sociology, international relations, as well as ethics. Mr. Seyyed Abolhasan Navvab is the Editor-in-Chief of the journal. For further information on IJIS, follow this link: http://ri.urd.ac.ir/news?newsCode=951

URD already publishes the journal of Religious Inquiries, which is covered in Web of Science. For more information on this journal, follow this link: http://ri.urd.ac.ir/

For more information on URD follow this link: https://urd.ac.ir/en/index

Manuscripts submitted to this journal will be deemed as they have not been published and are not under consideration for publication elsewhere. The journal welcomes the submission of manuscripts that meet the criteria of scholarly excellence. Our review process allows the authors and researchers an opportunity to use their expertise in a number of significant ways. Please note that IJIS uses Crossref™ to screen papers for unoriginal material. By submitting your paper to this journal you are agreeing to originality checks during the peer-review and production processes.

We are engaged to settle a website to get the articles for blind peer review; yet, until then, this journal accepts articles by direct email. Please send your submission to Ahmad Amid, the Managing Editor; email: urdjournals@gmail.com

 

 

7th Joint Human Rights Conference (London, 22-24 June 2020)

Human Rights and Foreign Policy

7th Joint Human Rights Conference
22-24 June 2020
University of London

Organized by:
Human Rights Consortium, University of London
Human Rights Section, International Studies Association (ISA)
Human Rights Section, American Political Science Association (APSA)
Human Rights Research Committee, International Political Science Association (IPSA)
Standing Group on Human Rights and Transitional Justice, European Consortium for Political Research (ECPR)

In light of geopolitical re-balancing of power, challenges to human rights from a number of quarters, and waning international support for human rights, the role of human rights in foreign policy requires urgent investigation. For human rights to thrive internationally, states need to support them not only domestically but also in their foreign policies, both in their bilateral relations and multilaterally. Yet, there is significant divergence of practice. Clear challenges appear in the policies of traditional supporters of human rights. This includes actions of the Trump administration on multiple fronts, as well as European states and the EU as a whole. European policy on refugees, for example, severely threatens basic international norms. And UK support for Saudi Arabia even as it carries on a murderous war in Yemen highlights hypocrisy.

Whereas a certain set of middle powers have traditionally been supporters of human rights internationally, and have explicitly incorporated human rights into their foreign policies, emerging powers in the developing world represent a much more diverse set of actors and perspectives on human rights and international institutions which, while providing opportunities for new kinds of engagement, also pose significant challenges.

Much of the work on human rights and foreign policy has focused on one state in particular – the United States – although there is increasing focus on the European Union, and there is clearly a need for much broader investigation and analysis, and broad-based comparative studies are scarce. Thus, an overarching question for the conference is: in 2020, what does foreign policy support for human rights look like?

Potential questions to be addressed during the conference include:

Are the traditional supporters of human rights internationally changing their support?
What opportunities and challenges does the emergence of new regional and global powers provide?
What are the internal and external processes which drive state support (or not) for human rights internationally?
What theoretical approaches best explain human rights foreign policies?
How do material and ideational factors influence and shape human rights foreign policies?
What role do emerging powers play in driving (or constraining) human rights internationally, and what are the similarities and differences between their positions?
How do we situate international organization actors like the European Union or the African Union which have some state-like characteristics internationally – or at least have such ambitions?
What role might sub-state political actors play in supporting human rights internationally?
How do transnational civil society networks affect state human rights foreign policies?
Are there divergences between states’ bilateral and multilateral human rights policies?
Can we identify a state of the art in empirical research on human rights-related foreign policy?

This is the 7th in a series of joint human rights conferences sponsored by the human sections of several international professional organizations, this time co-organised with, and hosted by, the Human Rights Consortium, University of London. The formal call for papers/panels will be released in August, with the submission deadline in November. In the meantime, subscribe to the official twitter feed of the conference  (@hrjc2020) and the Human Rights Consortium twitter feed (@HRC_News) for updates.

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